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PRESIDENT Ferdinand Marcos Jr. has ordered the regulation of the issuance of protocol license plates due to complaints about unauthorized use.Executive Secretary Lucas Bersamin signed on behalf of Marcos Executive Order 56 on March 25, 2024, amending Executive Order 400, which authorizes the assignment and issuance of protocol license plates to motor vehicles used by high-ranking government officials. Marcos issued the order due to the complaints about the proliferation and unauthorized use of protocol license plates, which threatens public safety and undermines the integrity of the vehicle registration system.Under EO 56, only the President of the Republic of the Philippines, the Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Cabinet secretaries, senators, members of the House of Representatives, associate justices of the Supreme Court, presiding justice of the Court of Appeals, Court of Tax Appeals, Sandiganbayan and Solicitor General, chairpersons of Constitutional Commissions and Ombudsman and chief of staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and Philippine National Police are allowed to be issued with protocol plates.It noted that all other officials with equivalent rank of the said authorized officials may be allowed to use or be issued with protocol license plates only upon the recommendation of the Land Transportation Office (LTO) and the approval of the Department of Transportation.The validity of the protocol license plates is only during the incumbency of the officials and may only be used for vehicles registered or officially assigned to them.Three corresponding license plates will be allowed to be issued each to the President, Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House and chief justice of the Supreme Court, while only two for other authorized government officials. (TPM/SunStar Philippines) Why do people play the slots? Philippines THE Cebu City Government’s executive department has requested the council to approve a budget of P96.94 million for El Niño preparedness and response during a special online session on Wednesday, March 27, 2024.However, the City Council deferred the budget’s approval, saying it needs further discussion.In the same session, the council placed 28 mountain barangays under state of calamity due to the adverse impact of the weather phenomenon El Niño.The council acknowledged the need to help 506 farmers tilling 115 hectares of lands in these villages.City City Agriculturist Joelito Baclayon said the barangays are Budlaan, Binaliw, Paril, Taptap, Pulangbato, Mabini, Malubog, Agsungot, Guba, Lusaran, Adlaon, Cambinocot, Pamutan, Sirao, Sapangdaku, Toong, Buhisan, Pung-ol Sibugay, Babag, Sudlon 1, Sudlon 2, Bonbon, Sinsin, Kalunasan, Buot, Tagbao, Busay and Tabunan.Soil cracksCity Councilor Joel Garganera, who sponsored the resolution during the special session, said based on the report of the City Agriculture Department, the Butuanon River upstream and Cotcot-Lusaran have experienced reduced stream flows due to less rainfall, and at least 50 percent of farms have shown presence of soil cracks due to lack of water.In a text message to SunStar Cebu, Baclayon clarified that El Niño affects 37 barangays in the city. However, mountain barangays are receiving greater focus due to their concentration of farms.Garganera said during the session that El Niño’s impact extends beyond the uplands, with barangays like Talamban, Lahug and Guadalupe, known for hog raising, also experiencing its effects.The approved resolution allows necessary expenditures for critical, urgent, and appropriate measures to mitigate the ill impacts of El Niño to be charged to the 2024 quick response fund of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF).However, the CDRRMO cannot still use the fund as the City Council still has to approve its annual investment plan (AIP) for its LDRRMF.Proposed budgetGarganera, chairman of the committee on environment, presented CDRRMO’s AIP during the special session. The resolution approves the Annual Investment Plan (AIP) of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund.The AIP covers agriculture expenditures: P80 million (purchase of seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, supplies, tools and equipment, and conduct of information campaign); health expenditures: P10 million (purchase of vaccines, drugs, and medicine for waterborne diseases, heat-related illnesses, and other supplies); and water sanitation and hygiene expenses: P2.74 million (procurement of a reverse osmosis water filtration system).Included also in the AIP are the budget for disaster response operations: P3 million (purchase of demolition/breaching tools, supplies, materials, and personal protective equipment); and information technology solutions: P1.2 million (two-year subscription of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-based internet connectivity, and equipment). LEO offers solutions to deliver internet access to remote or underserved areas where traditional ground-based infrastructure like cables or cell towers may be impossible or impractical to build.Councilors raise concernsCouncilor Nestor Archival questioned the necessity of the allocation for agricultural expenditures, arguing that the primary issue stemming from El Niño is water scarcity.“If we are going to give seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, these will be wasted because in farming the basic need is water,” he said.Archival also asked Garganera if the budget for procuring farm supplies had already been used and distributed to the farmers.Garganera said the amount remains unused.Agreeing to Archival’s opinion, Councilor Phillip Zafra suggested to the City prioritize purchasing materials to help conserve water, such as hoses, barrels, pumps and water trucks.Councilor Noel Wenceslao asked representatives from the agriculture department and city disaster office to further explain the proposed budget.For her part, Councilor Jocelyn Pesquera questioned the allocation of only P2.7 million for the reverse osmosis filtration system, despite its importance for addressing water supply issues.Pesquera also questioned the need to buy demolition/breaching tools and subscribe to LEO in response to the El Niño phenomenon.The councilor also asked if the personal protective equipment (PPE) is similar to the PPEs used during the Covid-19 pandemic, noting that the City still has several stocks.Garganera said the PPE is not for any respiratory-related diseases, but intended for agriculture use.Pesquera suggested that the CDRRMO re-study its proposed budget.Garganera moved to defer the budget approval and called for an executive session, which was seconded by Pesquera. The session is scheduled for Tuesday, April 2, at 1 p.m. / AML, JJL

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THE Cebu City Government’s executive department has requested the council to approve a budget of P96.94 million for El Niño preparedness and response during a special online session on Wednesday, March 27, 2024.However, the City Council deferred the budget’s approval, saying it needs further discussion.In the same session, the council placed 28 mountain barangays under state of calamity due to the adverse impact of the weather phenomenon El Niño.The council acknowledged the need to help 506 farmers tilling 115 hectares of lands in these villages.City City Agriculturist Joelito Baclayon said the barangays are Budlaan, Binaliw, Paril, Taptap, Pulangbato, Mabini, Malubog, Agsungot, Guba, Lusaran, Adlaon, Cambinocot, Pamutan, Sirao, Sapangdaku, Toong, Buhisan, Pung-ol Sibugay, Babag, Sudlon 1, Sudlon 2, Bonbon, Sinsin, Kalunasan, Buot, Tagbao, Busay and Tabunan.Soil cracksCity Councilor Joel Garganera, who sponsored the resolution during the special session, said based on the report of the City Agriculture Department, the Butuanon River upstream and Cotcot-Lusaran have experienced reduced stream flows due to less rainfall, and at least 50 percent of farms have shown presence of soil cracks due to lack of water.In a text message to SunStar Cebu, Baclayon clarified that El Niño affects 37 barangays in the city. However, mountain barangays are receiving greater focus due to their concentration of farms.Garganera said during the session that El Niño’s impact extends beyond the uplands, with barangays like Talamban, Lahug and Guadalupe, known for hog raising, also experiencing its effects.The approved resolution allows necessary expenditures for critical, urgent, and appropriate measures to mitigate the ill impacts of El Niño to be charged to the 2024 quick response fund of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF).However, the CDRRMO cannot still use the fund as the City Council still has to approve its annual investment plan (AIP) for its LDRRMF.Proposed budgetGarganera, chairman of the committee on environment, presented CDRRMO’s AIP during the special session. The resolution approves the Annual Investment Plan (AIP) of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund.The AIP covers agriculture expenditures: P80 million (purchase of seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, supplies, tools and equipment, and conduct of information campaign); health expenditures: P10 million (purchase of vaccines, drugs, and medicine for waterborne diseases, heat-related illnesses, and other supplies); and water sanitation and hygiene expenses: P2.74 million (procurement of a reverse osmosis water filtration system).Included also in the AIP are the budget for disaster response operations: P3 million (purchase of demolition/breaching tools, supplies, materials, and personal protective equipment); and information technology solutions: P1.2 million (two-year subscription of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-based internet connectivity, and equipment). LEO offers solutions to deliver internet access to remote or underserved areas where traditional ground-based infrastructure like cables or cell towers may be impossible or impractical to build.Councilors raise concernsCouncilor Nestor Archival questioned the necessity of the allocation for agricultural expenditures, arguing that the primary issue stemming from El Niño is water scarcity.“If we are going to give seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, these will be wasted because in farming the basic need is water,” he said.Archival also asked Garganera if the budget for procuring farm supplies had already been used and distributed to the farmers.Garganera said the amount remains unused.Agreeing to Archival’s opinion, Councilor Phillip Zafra suggested to the City prioritize purchasing materials to help conserve water, such as hoses, barrels, pumps and water trucks.Councilor Noel Wenceslao asked representatives from the agriculture department and city disaster office to further explain the proposed budget.For her part, Councilor Jocelyn Pesquera questioned the allocation of only P2.7 million for the reverse osmosis filtration system, despite its importance for addressing water supply issues.Pesquera also questioned the need to buy demolition/breaching tools and subscribe to LEO in response to the El Niño phenomenon.The councilor also asked if the personal protective equipment (PPE) is similar to the PPEs used during the Covid-19 pandemic, noting that the City still has several stocks.Garganera said the PPE is not for any respiratory-related diseases, but intended for agriculture use.Pesquera suggested that the CDRRMO re-study its proposed budget.Garganera moved to defer the budget approval and called for an executive session, which was seconded by Pesquera. The session is scheduled for Tuesday, April 2, at 1 p.m. / AML, JJL What is the Bisaya of slot? THE Office of the Government Corporate Counsel (OGCC) has released its opinion on the partial intervention of the Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) in the Metropolitan Cebu Water District (MCWD).But the LWUA and the MCWD are interpreting it differently.The LWUA, in a statement issued on Tuesday, April 2, 2024, said the OGCC’s opinion affirmed the legality of its partial intervention.The OGCC said the LWUA is authorized to intervene in the operations and management of a water district, including policy-making. However, this power is subject to limitations imposed by its charter. In a statement dated March 26 and signed by Solomon Hermosura, government corporate counsel, and Owen Vidad, the officer-in-charge who handles the legal affairs of water districts, the OGCC explained that before the LWUA can intervene, it must establish that the water district has defaulted on its loan and it has provided the water district with an opportunity to remedy the default.AuthorizedThe OGCC said the LWUA must exhaust the procedures and remedies outlined in the loan agreement before resorting to intervention, ensuring compliance with due process requirements. The LWUA said the MCWD had defaulted on its loan, adding that the water district violated the terms of its Financial Assistance Contract (FAC). It cited the MCWD’s failure to address high non-revenue water that resulted in an annual loss of revenue of at least P117.759 million annually. This violated the agreement that both parties signed under Article IV, Section 7 of the existing FAC, it said.The LWUA issued a demand letter to MCWD board chairman Jose Daluz III and MCWD general manager Edgar Donoso titled “To Explain/Show Cause, To Turn Over Documents and To Stop the Usurpation of the Authority of the MCWD Interim Board of Directors and the Unauthorized Use of Facilities and Resources of MCWD.”“Prudent approach”LWUA Administrator Jose Moises Salonga said MCWD’s FAC with the LWUA provided several options for the LWUA in case the MCWD defaulted.“However, (the) LWUA decided to take a prudent approach by issuing an intervention order that is not only for (the) MCWD’s best interest but more so for the Cebuanos. (The) LWUA is offering a more holistic approach with (the) MCWD through partial intervention,” he said.LWUA Chairman Ronnie Ong issued a statement saying the agency has followed due process, adding that it even agreed with the MCWD’s request to wait for the OGCC’s opinion.“Now that it’s released, (the) LWUA takes note of their legal opinion affirming (the) LWUA’s power to intervene in water districts following that due process has been observed,” Ong said.He pointed out that they informed the MCWD of the partial intervention last March 15, while the FAC between the MCWD and the LWUA empowers the LWUA to implement intervention upon default without the need for judicial procedures or any administrative hearing or any negotiation steps in the LWUA. AssuranceHe said the LWUA provided various opportunities to the MCWD in 2023 to air its side in their various meetings and correspondences regarding finances, water rate and bidding issues.Ong assured that the LWUA’s partial intervention only involves the setting aside and the investigation of the MCWD’s regular board of directors (BOD) and shall not, in any way, affect rank-and-file employees and the delivery of services.“Accessible, uninterrupted and safe water supply to the Cebuanos will remain during the investigation and throughout the partial intervention,” he said.Daluz, in a phone interview on Tuesday, said he interpreted OGCC’s opinion as favorable to them.He said the status quo will remain in the MCWD’s regular BOD.He urged the LWUA to fulfill its earlier agreement to respect the OGCC’s opinion.Daluz explained that the MCWD has never defaulted on its loan, saying it has diligently paid the amortization for its about P12 million loan to LWUA. The MCWD had requested the OGCC for an opinion regarding LWUA’s partial intervention when it appointed an interim BOD last March 15. LWUA Administrator Salonga used Resolution 35, which was approved last September yet, as his authority to implement the agency’s “partial intervention” in the MCWD.The OGCC cited Section 61 (e) of the LWUA Law, which was established under Presidential Decree 198, also known as the Provincial Water Utilities Act of 1973, which allows the LWUA, without the necessity of judicial process, to take over and operate the facilities or properties in the event of a loan default by the local water district in the payment.To ascertain whether the MCWD has defaulted on the loan and the legitimacy of the LWUA’s intervention, the OGCC said it is necessary to examine any loan or financial agreement between the MCWD and the LWUA.No mention of the loanIt said the examination should consider various aspects of the agreement, such as the loan amount, payment schedules, interest rates, fees, events of default, default procedures, and other obligations of the MCWD outlined in the agreement. The OGCC pointed out that the LWUA’s letter dated March 15 did not mention the MCWD’s loan obligation to the LWUA or any default by the MCWD regarding the loan obligation. However, it said the LWUA may appoint an interim BOD during the period of its takeover or intervention of a local water district when the conditions for the LWUA’s takeover of, or intervention in, a local water district are present. “It must be emphasized that the takeover or intervention of a water district is authorized only to ensure payment of its overdue accounts, the satisfaction of its reserve requirements and the resolution of all its causes of default,” the OGCC reiterated. Old board “remains”The OGCC noted that during the takeover, the water district’s board members are not removed, as specified in Section 61 (e) of the LWUA Law. “For this purpose, the Administration may designate its employees or any person or organization to assume both the policy-making authority and the powers of management, including but not limited to, the establishment of water rates and service charges, the dismissal and hiring of personnel, the purchase of equipment, supplies or materials and such other actions as may be necessary to operate the water district efficiently. Such policy-making and management prerogatives may be returned to the Board of Directors and the general manager of the water district, respectively, when all of its overdue accounts have been paid, all its reserve requirements have been satisfied and all the causes of default have been met,” it said.It also cited Sections 17 and 18 of Title II of PD 198, which outline the powers and limitations of local water district boards, emphasizing their role in policy-making rather than detailed management. The OGCC said the original board can return when the default is resolved. / EHP, AML

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THE Office of the Government Corporate Counsel (OGCC) has released its opinion on the partial intervention of the Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) in the Metropolitan Cebu Water District (MCWD).But the LWUA and the MCWD are interpreting it differently.The LWUA, in a statement issued on Tuesday, April 2, 2024, said the OGCC’s opinion affirmed the legality of its partial intervention.The OGCC said the LWUA is authorized to intervene in the operations and management of a water district, including policy-making. However, this power is subject to limitations imposed by its charter. In a statement dated March 26 and signed by Solomon Hermosura, government corporate counsel, and Owen Vidad, the officer-in-charge who handles the legal affairs of water districts, the OGCC explained that before the LWUA can intervene, it must establish that the water district has defaulted on its loan and it has provided the water district with an opportunity to remedy the default.AuthorizedThe OGCC said the LWUA must exhaust the procedures and remedies outlined in the loan agreement before resorting to intervention, ensuring compliance with due process requirements. The LWUA said the MCWD had defaulted on its loan, adding that the water district violated the terms of its Financial Assistance Contract (FAC). It cited the MCWD’s failure to address high non-revenue water that resulted in an annual loss of revenue of at least P117.759 million annually. This violated the agreement that both parties signed under Article IV, Section 7 of the existing FAC, it said.The LWUA issued a demand letter to MCWD board chairman Jose Daluz III and MCWD general manager Edgar Donoso titled “To Explain/Show Cause, To Turn Over Documents and To Stop the Usurpation of the Authority of the MCWD Interim Board of Directors and the Unauthorized Use of Facilities and Resources of MCWD.”“Prudent approach”LWUA Administrator Jose Moises Salonga said MCWD’s FAC with the LWUA provided several options for the LWUA in case the MCWD defaulted.“However, (the) LWUA decided to take a prudent approach by issuing an intervention order that is not only for (the) MCWD’s best interest but more so for the Cebuanos. (The) LWUA is offering a more holistic approach with (the) MCWD through partial intervention,” he said.LWUA Chairman Ronnie Ong issued a statement saying the agency has followed due process, adding that it even agreed with the MCWD’s request to wait for the OGCC’s opinion.“Now that it’s released, (the) LWUA takes note of their legal opinion affirming (the) LWUA’s power to intervene in water districts following that due process has been observed,” Ong said.He pointed out that they informed the MCWD of the partial intervention last March 15, while the FAC between the MCWD and the LWUA empowers the LWUA to implement intervention upon default without the need for judicial procedures or any administrative hearing or any negotiation steps in the LWUA. AssuranceHe said the LWUA provided various opportunities to the MCWD in 2023 to air its side in their various meetings and correspondences regarding finances, water rate and bidding issues.Ong assured that the LWUA’s partial intervention only involves the setting aside and the investigation of the MCWD’s regular board of directors (BOD) and shall not, in any way, affect rank-and-file employees and the delivery of services.“Accessible, uninterrupted and safe water supply to the Cebuanos will remain during the investigation and throughout the partial intervention,” he said.Daluz, in a phone interview on Tuesday, said he interpreted OGCC’s opinion as favorable to them.He said the status quo will remain in the MCWD’s regular BOD.He urged the LWUA to fulfill its earlier agreement to respect the OGCC’s opinion.Daluz explained that the MCWD has never defaulted on its loan, saying it has diligently paid the amortization for its about P12 million loan to LWUA. The MCWD had requested the OGCC for an opinion regarding LWUA’s partial intervention when it appointed an interim BOD last March 15. LWUA Administrator Salonga used Resolution 35, which was approved last September yet, as his authority to implement the agency’s “partial intervention” in the MCWD.The OGCC cited Section 61 (e) of the LWUA Law, which was established under Presidential Decree 198, also known as the Provincial Water Utilities Act of 1973, which allows the LWUA, without the necessity of judicial process, to take over and operate the facilities or properties in the event of a loan default by the local water district in the payment.To ascertain whether the MCWD has defaulted on the loan and the legitimacy of the LWUA’s intervention, the OGCC said it is necessary to examine any loan or financial agreement between the MCWD and the LWUA.No mention of the loanIt said the examination should consider various aspects of the agreement, such as the loan amount, payment schedules, interest rates, fees, events of default, default procedures, and other obligations of the MCWD outlined in the agreement. The OGCC pointed out that the LWUA’s letter dated March 15 did not mention the MCWD’s loan obligation to the LWUA or any default by the MCWD regarding the loan obligation. However, it said the LWUA may appoint an interim BOD during the period of its takeover or intervention of a local water district when the conditions for the LWUA’s takeover of, or intervention in, a local water district are present. “It must be emphasized that the takeover or intervention of a water district is authorized only to ensure payment of its overdue accounts, the satisfaction of its reserve requirements and the resolution of all its causes of default,” the OGCC reiterated. Old board “remains”The OGCC noted that during the takeover, the water district’s board members are not removed, as specified in Section 61 (e) of the LWUA Law. “For this purpose, the Administration may designate its employees or any person or organization to assume both the policy-making authority and the powers of management, including but not limited to, the establishment of water rates and service charges, the dismissal and hiring of personnel, the purchase of equipment, supplies or materials and such other actions as may be necessary to operate the water district efficiently. Such policy-making and management prerogatives may be returned to the Board of Directors and the general manager of the water district, respectively, when all of its overdue accounts have been paid, all its reserve requirements have been satisfied and all the causes of default have been met,” it said.It also cited Sections 17 and 18 of Title II of PD 198, which outline the powers and limitations of local water district boards, emphasizing their role in policy-making rather than detailed management. The OGCC said the original board can return when the default is resolved. / EHP, AML What is the Bisaya of slot? PRESIDENT Ferdinand Marcos Jr. has ordered the regulation of the issuance of protocol license plates due to complaints about unauthorized use.Executive Secretary Lucas Bersamin signed on behalf of Marcos Executive Order 56 on March 25, 2024, amending Executive Order 400, which authorizes the assignment and issuance of protocol license plates to motor vehicles used by high-ranking government officials. Marcos issued the order due to the complaints about the proliferation and unauthorized use of protocol license plates, which threatens public safety and undermines the integrity of the vehicle registration system.Under EO 56, only the President of the Republic of the Philippines, the Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Cabinet secretaries, senators, members of the House of Representatives, associate justices of the Supreme Court, presiding justice of the Court of Appeals, Court of Tax Appeals, Sandiganbayan and Solicitor General, chairpersons of Constitutional Commissions and Ombudsman and chief of staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and Philippine National Police are allowed to be issued with protocol plates.It noted that all other officials with equivalent rank of the said authorized officials may be allowed to use or be issued with protocol license plates only upon the recommendation of the Land Transportation Office (LTO) and the approval of the Department of Transportation.The validity of the protocol license plates is only during the incumbency of the officials and may only be used for vehicles registered or officially assigned to them.Three corresponding license plates will be allowed to be issued each to the President, Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House and chief justice of the Supreme Court, while only two for other authorized government officials. (TPM/SunStar Philippines)

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PRESIDENT Ferdinand Marcos Jr. has ordered the regulation of the issuance of protocol license plates due to complaints about unauthorized use.Executive Secretary Lucas Bersamin signed on behalf of Marcos Executive Order 56 on March 25, 2024, amending Executive Order 400, which authorizes the assignment and issuance of protocol license plates to motor vehicles used by high-ranking government officials. Marcos issued the order due to the complaints about the proliferation and unauthorized use of protocol license plates, which threatens public safety and undermines the integrity of the vehicle registration system.Under EO 56, only the President of the Republic of the Philippines, the Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Cabinet secretaries, senators, members of the House of Representatives, associate justices of the Supreme Court, presiding justice of the Court of Appeals, Court of Tax Appeals, Sandiganbayan and Solicitor General, chairpersons of Constitutional Commissions and Ombudsman and chief of staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and Philippine National Police are allowed to be issued with protocol plates.It noted that all other officials with equivalent rank of the said authorized officials may be allowed to use or be issued with protocol license plates only upon the recommendation of the Land Transportation Office (LTO) and the approval of the Department of Transportation.The validity of the protocol license plates is only during the incumbency of the officials and may only be used for vehicles registered or officially assigned to them.Three corresponding license plates will be allowed to be issued each to the President, Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House and chief justice of the Supreme Court, while only two for other authorized government officials. (TPM/SunStar Philippines), BingoPlus casino games are available to play on any mobile device. The high tech embedded in the platform allows players to enjoy the same user-friendly interface. check the following table to see what categories most online casinos in the Philippines fit in.

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THE Cebu City Government’s executive department has requested the council to approve a budget of P96.94 million for El Niño preparedness and response during a special online session on Wednesday, March 27, 2024.However, the City Council deferred the budget’s approval, saying it needs further discussion.In the same session, the council placed 28 mountain barangays under state of calamity due to the adverse impact of the weather phenomenon El Niño.The council acknowledged the need to help 506 farmers tilling 115 hectares of lands in these villages.City City Agriculturist Joelito Baclayon said the barangays are Budlaan, Binaliw, Paril, Taptap, Pulangbato, Mabini, Malubog, Agsungot, Guba, Lusaran, Adlaon, Cambinocot, Pamutan, Sirao, Sapangdaku, Toong, Buhisan, Pung-ol Sibugay, Babag, Sudlon 1, Sudlon 2, Bonbon, Sinsin, Kalunasan, Buot, Tagbao, Busay and Tabunan.Soil cracksCity Councilor Joel Garganera, who sponsored the resolution during the special session, said based on the report of the City Agriculture Department, the Butuanon River upstream and Cotcot-Lusaran have experienced reduced stream flows due to less rainfall, and at least 50 percent of farms have shown presence of soil cracks due to lack of water.In a text message to SunStar Cebu, Baclayon clarified that El Niño affects 37 barangays in the city. However, mountain barangays are receiving greater focus due to their concentration of farms.Garganera said during the session that El Niño’s impact extends beyond the uplands, with barangays like Talamban, Lahug and Guadalupe, known for hog raising, also experiencing its effects.The approved resolution allows necessary expenditures for critical, urgent, and appropriate measures to mitigate the ill impacts of El Niño to be charged to the 2024 quick response fund of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF).However, the CDRRMO cannot still use the fund as the City Council still has to approve its annual investment plan (AIP) for its LDRRMF.Proposed budgetGarganera, chairman of the committee on environment, presented CDRRMO’s AIP during the special session. The resolution approves the Annual Investment Plan (AIP) of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund.The AIP covers agriculture expenditures: P80 million (purchase of seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, supplies, tools and equipment, and conduct of information campaign); health expenditures: P10 million (purchase of vaccines, drugs, and medicine for waterborne diseases, heat-related illnesses, and other supplies); and water sanitation and hygiene expenses: P2.74 million (procurement of a reverse osmosis water filtration system).Included also in the AIP are the budget for disaster response operations: P3 million (purchase of demolition/breaching tools, supplies, materials, and personal protective equipment); and information technology solutions: P1.2 million (two-year subscription of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-based internet connectivity, and equipment). LEO offers solutions to deliver internet access to remote or underserved areas where traditional ground-based infrastructure like cables or cell towers may be impossible or impractical to build.Councilors raise concernsCouncilor Nestor Archival questioned the necessity of the allocation for agricultural expenditures, arguing that the primary issue stemming from El Niño is water scarcity.“If we are going to give seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, these will be wasted because in farming the basic need is water,” he said.Archival also asked Garganera if the budget for procuring farm supplies had already been used and distributed to the farmers.Garganera said the amount remains unused.Agreeing to Archival’s opinion, Councilor Phillip Zafra suggested to the City prioritize purchasing materials to help conserve water, such as hoses, barrels, pumps and water trucks.Councilor Noel Wenceslao asked representatives from the agriculture department and city disaster office to further explain the proposed budget.For her part, Councilor Jocelyn Pesquera questioned the allocation of only P2.7 million for the reverse osmosis filtration system, despite its importance for addressing water supply issues.Pesquera also questioned the need to buy demolition/breaching tools and subscribe to LEO in response to the El Niño phenomenon.The councilor also asked if the personal protective equipment (PPE) is similar to the PPEs used during the Covid-19 pandemic, noting that the City still has several stocks.Garganera said the PPE is not for any respiratory-related diseases, but intended for agriculture use.Pesquera suggested that the CDRRMO re-study its proposed budget.Garganera moved to defer the budget approval and called for an executive session, which was seconded by Pesquera. The session is scheduled for Tuesday, April 2, at 1 p.m. / AML, JJL Why do people play the slots?. here is how to register at an online casino site in the Philippines:

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PRESIDENT Ferdinand Marcos Jr. has ordered the regulation of the issuance of protocol license plates due to complaints about unauthorized use.Executive Secretary Lucas Bersamin signed on behalf of Marcos Executive Order 56 on March 25, 2024, amending Executive Order 400, which authorizes the assignment and issuance of protocol license plates to motor vehicles used by high-ranking government officials. Marcos issued the order due to the complaints about the proliferation and unauthorized use of protocol license plates, which threatens public safety and undermines the integrity of the vehicle registration system.Under EO 56, only the President of the Republic of the Philippines, the Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Cabinet secretaries, senators, members of the House of Representatives, associate justices of the Supreme Court, presiding justice of the Court of Appeals, Court of Tax Appeals, Sandiganbayan and Solicitor General, chairpersons of Constitutional Commissions and Ombudsman and chief of staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and Philippine National Police are allowed to be issued with protocol plates.It noted that all other officials with equivalent rank of the said authorized officials may be allowed to use or be issued with protocol license plates only upon the recommendation of the Land Transportation Office (LTO) and the approval of the Department of Transportation.The validity of the protocol license plates is only during the incumbency of the officials and may only be used for vehicles registered or officially assigned to them.Three corresponding license plates will be allowed to be issued each to the President, Vice President, Senate President, Speaker of the House and chief justice of the Supreme Court, while only two for other authorized government officials. (TPM/SunStar Philippines) What is the Bisaya of slot? . It’s always a good idea to take your time and make sure you’ve found the best online casino in the Philippines on the online gambling market that can give you what you want.

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THE Cebu City Government’s executive department has requested the council to approve a budget of P96.94 million for El Niño preparedness and response during a special online session on Wednesday, March 27, 2024.However, the City Council deferred the budget’s approval, saying it needs further discussion.In the same session, the council placed 28 mountain barangays under state of calamity due to the adverse impact of the weather phenomenon El Niño.The council acknowledged the need to help 506 farmers tilling 115 hectares of lands in these villages.City City Agriculturist Joelito Baclayon said the barangays are Budlaan, Binaliw, Paril, Taptap, Pulangbato, Mabini, Malubog, Agsungot, Guba, Lusaran, Adlaon, Cambinocot, Pamutan, Sirao, Sapangdaku, Toong, Buhisan, Pung-ol Sibugay, Babag, Sudlon 1, Sudlon 2, Bonbon, Sinsin, Kalunasan, Buot, Tagbao, Busay and Tabunan.Soil cracksCity Councilor Joel Garganera, who sponsored the resolution during the special session, said based on the report of the City Agriculture Department, the Butuanon River upstream and Cotcot-Lusaran have experienced reduced stream flows due to less rainfall, and at least 50 percent of farms have shown presence of soil cracks due to lack of water.In a text message to SunStar Cebu, Baclayon clarified that El Niño affects 37 barangays in the city. However, mountain barangays are receiving greater focus due to their concentration of farms.Garganera said during the session that El Niño’s impact extends beyond the uplands, with barangays like Talamban, Lahug and Guadalupe, known for hog raising, also experiencing its effects.The approved resolution allows necessary expenditures for critical, urgent, and appropriate measures to mitigate the ill impacts of El Niño to be charged to the 2024 quick response fund of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF).However, the CDRRMO cannot still use the fund as the City Council still has to approve its annual investment plan (AIP) for its LDRRMF.Proposed budgetGarganera, chairman of the committee on environment, presented CDRRMO’s AIP during the special session. The resolution approves the Annual Investment Plan (AIP) of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund.The AIP covers agriculture expenditures: P80 million (purchase of seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, supplies, tools and equipment, and conduct of information campaign); health expenditures: P10 million (purchase of vaccines, drugs, and medicine for waterborne diseases, heat-related illnesses, and other supplies); and water sanitation and hygiene expenses: P2.74 million (procurement of a reverse osmosis water filtration system).Included also in the AIP are the budget for disaster response operations: P3 million (purchase of demolition/breaching tools, supplies, materials, and personal protective equipment); and information technology solutions: P1.2 million (two-year subscription of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-based internet connectivity, and equipment). LEO offers solutions to deliver internet access to remote or underserved areas where traditional ground-based infrastructure like cables or cell towers may be impossible or impractical to build.Councilors raise concernsCouncilor Nestor Archival questioned the necessity of the allocation for agricultural expenditures, arguing that the primary issue stemming from El Niño is water scarcity.“If we are going to give seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, these will be wasted because in farming the basic need is water,” he said.Archival also asked Garganera if the budget for procuring farm supplies had already been used and distributed to the farmers.Garganera said the amount remains unused.Agreeing to Archival’s opinion, Councilor Phillip Zafra suggested to the City prioritize purchasing materials to help conserve water, such as hoses, barrels, pumps and water trucks.Councilor Noel Wenceslao asked representatives from the agriculture department and city disaster office to further explain the proposed budget.For her part, Councilor Jocelyn Pesquera questioned the allocation of only P2.7 million for the reverse osmosis filtration system, despite its importance for addressing water supply issues.Pesquera also questioned the need to buy demolition/breaching tools and subscribe to LEO in response to the El Niño phenomenon.The councilor also asked if the personal protective equipment (PPE) is similar to the PPEs used during the Covid-19 pandemic, noting that the City still has several stocks.Garganera said the PPE is not for any respiratory-related diseases, but intended for agriculture use.Pesquera suggested that the CDRRMO re-study its proposed budget.Garganera moved to defer the budget approval and called for an executive session, which was seconded by Pesquera. The session is scheduled for Tuesday, April 2, at 1 p.m. / AML, JJL licensed online casinos THE Office of the Government Corporate Counsel (OGCC) has released its opinion on the partial intervention of the Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) in the Metropolitan Cebu Water District (MCWD).But the LWUA and the MCWD are interpreting it differently.The LWUA, in a statement issued on Tuesday, April 2, 2024, said the OGCC’s opinion affirmed the legality of its partial intervention.The OGCC said the LWUA is authorized to intervene in the operations and management of a water district, including policy-making. However, this power is subject to limitations imposed by its charter. In a statement dated March 26 and signed by Solomon Hermosura, government corporate counsel, and Owen Vidad, the officer-in-charge who handles the legal affairs of water districts, the OGCC explained that before the LWUA can intervene, it must establish that the water district has defaulted on its loan and it has provided the water district with an opportunity to remedy the default.AuthorizedThe OGCC said the LWUA must exhaust the procedures and remedies outlined in the loan agreement before resorting to intervention, ensuring compliance with due process requirements. The LWUA said the MCWD had defaulted on its loan, adding that the water district violated the terms of its Financial Assistance Contract (FAC). It cited the MCWD’s failure to address high non-revenue water that resulted in an annual loss of revenue of at least P117.759 million annually. This violated the agreement that both parties signed under Article IV, Section 7 of the existing FAC, it said.The LWUA issued a demand letter to MCWD board chairman Jose Daluz III and MCWD general manager Edgar Donoso titled “To Explain/Show Cause, To Turn Over Documents and To Stop the Usurpation of the Authority of the MCWD Interim Board of Directors and the Unauthorized Use of Facilities and Resources of MCWD.”“Prudent approach”LWUA Administrator Jose Moises Salonga said MCWD’s FAC with the LWUA provided several options for the LWUA in case the MCWD defaulted.“However, (the) LWUA decided to take a prudent approach by issuing an intervention order that is not only for (the) MCWD’s best interest but more so for the Cebuanos. (The) LWUA is offering a more holistic approach with (the) MCWD through partial intervention,” he said.LWUA Chairman Ronnie Ong issued a statement saying the agency has followed due process, adding that it even agreed with the MCWD’s request to wait for the OGCC’s opinion.“Now that it’s released, (the) LWUA takes note of their legal opinion affirming (the) LWUA’s power to intervene in water districts following that due process has been observed,” Ong said.He pointed out that they informed the MCWD of the partial intervention last March 15, while the FAC between the MCWD and the LWUA empowers the LWUA to implement intervention upon default without the need for judicial procedures or any administrative hearing or any negotiation steps in the LWUA. AssuranceHe said the LWUA provided various opportunities to the MCWD in 2023 to air its side in their various meetings and correspondences regarding finances, water rate and bidding issues.Ong assured that the LWUA’s partial intervention only involves the setting aside and the investigation of the MCWD’s regular board of directors (BOD) and shall not, in any way, affect rank-and-file employees and the delivery of services.“Accessible, uninterrupted and safe water supply to the Cebuanos will remain during the investigation and throughout the partial intervention,” he said.Daluz, in a phone interview on Tuesday, said he interpreted OGCC’s opinion as favorable to them.He said the status quo will remain in the MCWD’s regular BOD.He urged the LWUA to fulfill its earlier agreement to respect the OGCC’s opinion.Daluz explained that the MCWD has never defaulted on its loan, saying it has diligently paid the amortization for its about P12 million loan to LWUA. The MCWD had requested the OGCC for an opinion regarding LWUA’s partial intervention when it appointed an interim BOD last March 15. LWUA Administrator Salonga used Resolution 35, which was approved last September yet, as his authority to implement the agency’s “partial intervention” in the MCWD.The OGCC cited Section 61 (e) of the LWUA Law, which was established under Presidential Decree 198, also known as the Provincial Water Utilities Act of 1973, which allows the LWUA, without the necessity of judicial process, to take over and operate the facilities or properties in the event of a loan default by the local water district in the payment.To ascertain whether the MCWD has defaulted on the loan and the legitimacy of the LWUA’s intervention, the OGCC said it is necessary to examine any loan or financial agreement between the MCWD and the LWUA.No mention of the loanIt said the examination should consider various aspects of the agreement, such as the loan amount, payment schedules, interest rates, fees, events of default, default procedures, and other obligations of the MCWD outlined in the agreement. The OGCC pointed out that the LWUA’s letter dated March 15 did not mention the MCWD’s loan obligation to the LWUA or any default by the MCWD regarding the loan obligation. However, it said the LWUA may appoint an interim BOD during the period of its takeover or intervention of a local water district when the conditions for the LWUA’s takeover of, or intervention in, a local water district are present. “It must be emphasized that the takeover or intervention of a water district is authorized only to ensure payment of its overdue accounts, the satisfaction of its reserve requirements and the resolution of all its causes of default,” the OGCC reiterated. Old board “remains”The OGCC noted that during the takeover, the water district’s board members are not removed, as specified in Section 61 (e) of the LWUA Law. “For this purpose, the Administration may designate its employees or any person or organization to assume both the policy-making authority and the powers of management, including but not limited to, the establishment of water rates and service charges, the dismissal and hiring of personnel, the purchase of equipment, supplies or materials and such other actions as may be necessary to operate the water district efficiently. Such policy-making and management prerogatives may be returned to the Board of Directors and the general manager of the water district, respectively, when all of its overdue accounts have been paid, all its reserve requirements have been satisfied and all the causes of default have been met,” it said.It also cited Sections 17 and 18 of Title II of PD 198, which outline the powers and limitations of local water district boards, emphasizing their role in policy-making rather than detailed management. The OGCC said the original board can return when the default is resolved. / EHP, AML

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THE Cebu City Government’s executive department has requested the council to approve a budget of P96.94 million for El Niño preparedness and response during a special online session on Wednesday, March 27, 2024.However, the City Council deferred the budget’s approval, saying it needs further discussion.In the same session, the council placed 28 mountain barangays under state of calamity due to the adverse impact of the weather phenomenon El Niño.The council acknowledged the need to help 506 farmers tilling 115 hectares of lands in these villages.City City Agriculturist Joelito Baclayon said the barangays are Budlaan, Binaliw, Paril, Taptap, Pulangbato, Mabini, Malubog, Agsungot, Guba, Lusaran, Adlaon, Cambinocot, Pamutan, Sirao, Sapangdaku, Toong, Buhisan, Pung-ol Sibugay, Babag, Sudlon 1, Sudlon 2, Bonbon, Sinsin, Kalunasan, Buot, Tagbao, Busay and Tabunan.Soil cracksCity Councilor Joel Garganera, who sponsored the resolution during the special session, said based on the report of the City Agriculture Department, the Butuanon River upstream and Cotcot-Lusaran have experienced reduced stream flows due to less rainfall, and at least 50 percent of farms have shown presence of soil cracks due to lack of water.In a text message to SunStar Cebu, Baclayon clarified that El Niño affects 37 barangays in the city. However, mountain barangays are receiving greater focus due to their concentration of farms.Garganera said during the session that El Niño’s impact extends beyond the uplands, with barangays like Talamban, Lahug and Guadalupe, known for hog raising, also experiencing its effects.The approved resolution allows necessary expenditures for critical, urgent, and appropriate measures to mitigate the ill impacts of El Niño to be charged to the 2024 quick response fund of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF).However, the CDRRMO cannot still use the fund as the City Council still has to approve its annual investment plan (AIP) for its LDRRMF.Proposed budgetGarganera, chairman of the committee on environment, presented CDRRMO’s AIP during the special session. The resolution approves the Annual Investment Plan (AIP) of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund.The AIP covers agriculture expenditures: P80 million (purchase of seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, supplies, tools and equipment, and conduct of information campaign); health expenditures: P10 million (purchase of vaccines, drugs, and medicine for waterborne diseases, heat-related illnesses, and other supplies); and water sanitation and hygiene expenses: P2.74 million (procurement of a reverse osmosis water filtration system).Included also in the AIP are the budget for disaster response operations: P3 million (purchase of demolition/breaching tools, supplies, materials, and personal protective equipment); and information technology solutions: P1.2 million (two-year subscription of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-based internet connectivity, and equipment). LEO offers solutions to deliver internet access to remote or underserved areas where traditional ground-based infrastructure like cables or cell towers may be impossible or impractical to build.Councilors raise concernsCouncilor Nestor Archival questioned the necessity of the allocation for agricultural expenditures, arguing that the primary issue stemming from El Niño is water scarcity.“If we are going to give seeds, fertilizers and pesticides, these will be wasted because in farming the basic need is water,” he said.Archival also asked Garganera if the budget for procuring farm supplies had already been used and distributed to the farmers.Garganera said the amount remains unused.Agreeing to Archival’s opinion, Councilor Phillip Zafra suggested to the City prioritize purchasing materials to help conserve water, such as hoses, barrels, pumps and water trucks.Councilor Noel Wenceslao asked representatives from the agriculture department and city disaster office to further explain the proposed budget.For her part, Councilor Jocelyn Pesquera questioned the allocation of only P2.7 million for the reverse osmosis filtration system, despite its importance for addressing water supply issues.Pesquera also questioned the need to buy demolition/breaching tools and subscribe to LEO in response to the El Niño phenomenon.The councilor also asked if the personal protective equipment (PPE) is similar to the PPEs used during the Covid-19 pandemic, noting that the City still has several stocks.Garganera said the PPE is not for any respiratory-related diseases, but intended for agriculture use.Pesquera suggested that the CDRRMO re-study its proposed budget.Garganera moved to defer the budget approval and called for an executive session, which was seconded by Pesquera. The session is scheduled for Tuesday, April 2, at 1 p.m. / AML, JJL Why do people play the slots?

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